Is This How To Get A Job Interview?

Is this how to get a job interview? French study reveals that women wearing low-cut top are 19 times more likely to get job interviews. And We Thought All It Took Was A Brilliant Resume!

Whoa! Whaaatt? Surely this can’t be true? All this time we thought all you needed was a cracking resume! Clearly not, at least in France, where the study took place.

It seems that CV Saviour might need to rethink the guidelines we give our clients for LinkedIn profile photos. One thing is for sure, we are not for minute going to suggest that you go put your photo on your resume (or a photo of yourself in a low-cut top either. For starters, images can cause all sorts of issues for ATS systems so you resume might not get read in the first place!) however, we will be watching the outcome of further research by the author (also responsible for the study “The Impact of Beauty during Job Applications” with interest.

The study has been widely reported in the lead up to the Appearance Matters Conference – the world’s largest event on body image and disfigurement. The conference will see more than 200 appearance experts from across the world tackle issues including weight loss surgery, eating disorders and ‘ultra-thin’ dolls. Dr Kertechian decided to research the impact clothing had on the recruitment process after realising it had never been studied.

Here’s the article from news.com.au,

TO BE honest, we found this new research out of France a little surprising. 

We thought the only reason you’d present yourself in a low-cut top when applying for a job would be if that job was at Hooters. But it seems that we’ve got that all wrong.

A new study carried out in Paris has shown that female applicants were more successful in securing job interviews when pictured wearing a low-cut top.

Sevag Kertechian, a researcher based at the Paris-Sorbonne University decided to research the impact clothing had on the recruitment process after discovering that it had never been properly studied.

Over the course of three years as job advertisements in the sales and accounting field arose, DR Kertechian put two fictional women forward for the roles.

In the face they look almost identical and in the application they had near identical skills and experience.

job interview clothes, what to wear to job interview,

To ensure the experiment was fair each woman was forwarded for 100 roles wearing the revealing outfit and 100 jobs in the more traditional clothing (the photograph was attached to their application).

What he found was that the woman wearing the low-cut dress captured the attention of the recruiters more successfully. And the difference was substantial — the woman in the more revealing outfit was 19 times more likely to secure a face-to-face interview.

Of the 200 sales role applications, the low-cut dress submissions received 62 more interview offers than their counterparts.

From the 200 accountancy applications there were 68 more interview offers for the more provocatively-dressed woman.

There are a few things to consider here that limit the findings a little. Firstly, the experiment was conducted in France and maybe employees in different parts of the world have different … values.
It’s also important to note that the experiment only covered two sectors of the workforce: sales and accounting.

Finally, this is operating on the assumption that people attach a photo to their resume when they apply for a job. While this isn’t such a common practice in Australia, perhaps we should all be reconsidering our LinkedIn profile pic.

Dr Kertechian said: “Our results showed interesting trends as low-cut dresses significantly influenced the choice of the recruiters, even for accounting positions.

“Regardless of the job, whether customer-facing saleswoman or office-based accountant, the candidate with the low cut clothing received more positive answers.

“The results were quite shocking and negative but not necessarily surprising — they show we need to conduct more research.”

Clearly!

 

How To Get Your Resume Noticed By Hiring Managers

There’s nothing worse than applying for one job after another, and hearing nothing back from recruiters. But how do you get your resume noticed when hundreds are applying for the same job as you?

A new study by Career Builder shows job seekers what hiring managers really want, and what job seekers need to do to increase their chances of getting to interview, but there are no surprises in what they’ve found …

For many job seekers, there’s nothing more discouraging than spending hours finessing your resume, crafting the perfectly worded cover letter, and filling out that tedious online application (Seriously? I just uploaded my resume, and I still have to fill in my entire work experience? IT MAKES NO SENSE!) – only to never hear anything back. What gives?

A new study from CareerBuilder may offer some insight. More than 1,500 recruiters and hiring managers nationwide (US) participated in a recent survey to determine what companies are looking for when they’re hiring, their biggest frustrations during the hiring process and what job seekers can do to increase their chances of being seen.

Be more than your resume – make it easy for the recruiter to find your skills and talents on your resume.

Just over half of employers surveyed (53%) say resumes do not provide enough information for them to accurately make an initial decision whether or not someone is a good fit for the job. (Perhaps that’s why so many employers are researching candidates on social media, according to an earlier CareerBuilder study.)

But here’s where you can help them fill in the gaps: In addition to a resume, 39% of employers say they want to see examples of work the candidate has done or an online portfolio (you can provide a URL to your portfolio or personal website in your resume), and 29% want a cover letter.

Another interesting finding? Nearly half of employers (48%) reach out directly to job seekers when they have an opening – all the more reason to build your personal brand through your resume, cover letters, online portfolio or personal website and social media presence. When you cover these bases, you can cut your job search efforts in half by increasing the chances of employers finding and approaching you.

Stay on an employer’s good side – give them the information they need to see on your resume, and don’t follow them up too frequently (or not at all!)

When it comes to employers’ biggest frustrations with candidates, their biggest complaint is having applicants who apply for positions for which they aren’t qualified (39%). Other pet peeves include:

  • Unrealistic expectations about salary/pay – 18%
  • Lying about their experience/qualifications – 13%
  • Checking in on progress too frequently – 8%
  • Resumes do not provide enough information about them – 8%
  • Not responsive enough – 8%
  • Resumes are poorly done – 4%

Are you guilty of any of these behaviours? If so, it might be time to adjust your approach to employers. For example, if you’ve been told that you have unrealistic expectations around salary, learn the right way to successfully negotiate salary. Feel you need to stretch the truth about your experience or qualifications to get the attention of employers? Try this approach instead. And find out how to follow up with employers and avoid these all-too-common resume mistakes.

Questions employers have about job seekers – how to make your resume stand out.

Think you’re the only one with questions? Turns out, employers are just as baffled by job seekers as job seekers are of employers. When asked about the top questions employers have about job seekers, here were their top answers:

  • Do their skills match what we want? – 77%
  • What are their current skills? – 75%
  • What is their work history? – 73%
  • What soft skills do they have? – 63%
  • Will they be a good company culture fit? – 61%
  • What is their salary expectation? – 50%
  • Will they stay with our company long-term? – 47%
  • Will they have the educational background we are looking for? – 47%
  • Why are they searching for a new job/career? – 46%

Get your professional resume now and get the job interview

Now that you have a better idea of the information employers want, make it easy for them to find. Address these points (briefly) in your cover letter (CV Saviour advises that you save the salary talk, and the reason for leaving a job for the interview, although there are certain circumstances where we might advise otherwise), or on your personal website or online portfolio.

How is your resume looking? Want some feedback on how you can improve yours? Take our free CV Health Check, or contact us for a quote for your professional resume.

This article by Mary Lorenz first appeared on CareerBuilder.

 

Resume Writing Quick Tip #3 – Add Hyperlinks

Want your resume to stand out to recruiters? Check out quick tip #3.

The 3rd in our series of super quick tips to help you get your resume right, right from the start. Add hyperlinks, and show your future employer just how tech savvy you are, and make it easy for them to learn more about you without leaving your resume. Find out how to add hyperlinks to your resume now.

Look out for quick tip #4, coming soon.

Resume Writing Quick Tip #2 – Check Your Document Properties

What is in your resume document properties? Check out quick tip #2.

The 2nd in our series of super quick tips to help you get your resume right, right from the start. What is in your resume document properties? It had better not be someone esle’s name! Find out how to check the hidden data in your CV or resume now.

Learn how to load up your document properties with metadata that might just increase how you score in an Applicant Tracking System (ATS). And learn why you should check it doesn’t have someone else’s name in it! Look out for quick tip #3, coming soon.